Tag Archives: sin

Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 6

Question 16. Why must he be very man, and also perfectly righteous?

Answer: Because the justice of God requires that the same human nature which has sinned, should likewise make satisfaction for sin; and one, who is himself a sinner, cannot satisfy for others.

Question 17. Why must he in one person be also very God?

Answer: That he might, by the power of his Godhead sustain in his human nature, the burden of God’s wrath; and might obtain for, and restore to us, righteousness and life.

Question 18. Who then is that Mediator, who is in one person both very God, and a real righteous man?

Answer: Our Lord Jesus Christ: “who of God is made unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption.”

Question 19. From where do you know this?

Answer: From the holy gospel, which God himself first revealed in Paradise; and afterwards published by the patriarchs and prophets, and represented by the sacrifices and other ceremonies of the law; and lastly, has fulfilled it by his only begotten Son.

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A Thought on Sin and Repentance

That although there is no sin so small but it deserves damnation, yet there is no sin so great that it shall bring damnation on them that repent.

—- an excerpt from Chapter 15 of The 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith.

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Some Thoughts from Psalm 90

Psalm 90
A Prayer of Moses the man of God.

Lord, You have been our dwelling place in all generations. Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever You had formed the earth and the world, Even from everlasting to everlasting, You are God. You turn man to destruction, and say, “Return, O children of men.” For a thousand years in Your sight Are like yesterday when it is past, And like a watch in the night. You carry them away like a flood; they are like a sleep. In the morning they are like grass which grows up: in the morning it flourishes and grows up; in the evening it is cut down and withers.

For we have been consumed by Your anger, and by Your wrath we are terrified. You have set our iniquities before You, our secret sins in the light of Your countenance. For all our days have passed away in Your wrath; we finish our years like a sigh. The days of our lives are seventy years; and if by reason of strength they are eighty years, yet their boast is only labor and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we fly away. Who knows the power of Your anger? For as the fear of You, so is Your wrath.

So teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom. Return, O LORD! How long? And have compassion on Your servants. Oh, satisfy us early with Your mercy, that we may rejoice and be glad all our days! Make us glad according to the days in which You have afflicted us, The years in which we have seen evil. Let Your work appear to Your servants, and Your glory to their children. And let the beauty of the LORD our God be upon us, and establish the work of our hands for us; yes, establish the work of our hands.

NKJV

These notes  are from the Reformation Heritage KJV Study Bible on this Psalm. 

  1. Death is not a natural event to which we should resign ourselves but a sign of God’s anger upon mankind for our sins. Though we would rather not think about it, we gain much wisdom by meditating on the brevity of life, the certainty of death and the eternity of the God who rules both life and death. The reality of death strips away our pretenses of pride and independence and reminds us of God’s absolute power over us and wrath against sin. How should these truths humble us?
  2. The reality of death also moves us to find a dwelling place in God that will outlast this life. This world loses its charm when we see it as a temporary home, but God is eternal. This is the great wisdom given to us by the gospel to trust in the Lord Jesus Christ for eternal life (2 Tim 3:15). Pray that God would have mercy upon you for your sins, give you eternal joy and satisfaction in His love, and work in you that your works will have lasting value.

 

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All Welcome. No Exception. by R. Scott Clark

This is an exceptional and challenging read. I recommend it to all believers.

All Welcome. No Exceptions.

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Drunks and Pigs (Luther) from the pen of Shane Lems

(This is a repost from February 2013.) Sadly, some Calvinists think it’s cool to cuss and drink.  To be sure, cussing is neither calvinistic nor is it Christian.  A person who really understands Ca…

Source: Drunks and Pigs (Luther)

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Justification

This past Wednesday we sang this hymn at prayer meeting. Parts of it have stuck with me since then.

Justification

by

Augustus M. Toplady and William Croft

If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink. John 7:37

Fountain of never ceasing grace, Thy saints’ exhaustless theme, Great object of immortal praise, Essentially supreme;

We bless thee for the glorious fruits Thine incarnation gives; The righteousness which grace imputes, And faith alone receives.

In thee we have a righteousness By God himself approved; Our rock, our sure foundation this, Which never can be moved.

Our ransom by thy death was paid, For all thy people giv’n, The law thou perfectly obeyed, That they might enter heav’n.

As all, when Adam sinned alone, In his transgression died, So by the righteousness of one Are sinners justified;

We to thy merit, gracious Lord, With humblest joy submit, Again to Paradise restored, In thee alone complete. Amen.

Trinity Hymnal #440

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A few thoughts from John Calvin’s commentary on John’s Gospel

This is an excerpt from John Calvin’s commentary on the Gospel According to John.

Then a great multitude followed Him, because they saw His signs which He performed on those who were diseased.           John 6:2

“Here we see, in the first place, how eager was the desire of the people to hear Christ, since all of them, forgetting themselves, take no concern about spending the night in a desert place. So much the less excusable is our indifference, or rather our sloth, when we are so far from preferring the heavenly doctrine to the gnawings of hunger, that the slightest interruptions immediately lead us away from meditation on the heavenly life. Very rarely does it happen that Christ finds us free and disengaged from the entanglements of the world. So far is every one of us from being ready to follow him to a desert mountain, that scarcely one in ten can endure to receive him, when he presents himself at home in the midst of comforts. And though this disease prevails nearly throughout the whole world, yet it is certain that no man will be fit for the kingdom of God until, laying aside such delicacy, he learn to desire the food of the soul so earnestly that his belly shall not hinder him.”

As I read this section, particularly the italicized portion(mine), I could not help but think how easily I am distracted from heavenly things. As I sit in my office, surrounded by the writings of godly men and especially the Word of God itself my mind is so easily distracted at a ding (notification) on my cell phone, or the things on my to do list or my computer sitting six feet from me that I struggle to spend any amount of time worshiping Him who loved me and washed me from my sins in His own blood.

Man’s nature is no different now then it was five hundred years ago when Mr. Calvin penned these words but thank God the remedy is still the same, “the blood of Jesus Christ His Son cleanses us from all sin”, blessed be the Name of the Lord!

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